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It is upsetting – most of the time I find myself scrolling through Facebook rather than talking to people in real life. But isn’t this our all little guilty pleasure?

To me, it is astonishing – the once so exclusive website for Mark Zuckerberg and his Harvard classmates almost 13 years ago has now grown to a massive network site. By massive I mean really massive – if Facebook was a country it’d be the third largest in the world.

Zuckerberg’s claimed concept of  ʻʻmaking the world social’’ inevitably calls for a long discussion on widely spreading anti-socialism. Yet, without the Internet and Facebook none of us would be able to have a deep conversation with our friends about last night’s crazy party. The USA or Australia – it doesn’t matter; your friends are just a reach away.

Although we live in a world of capitalism, I doubt that Zuckerberg’s initial goal was to make profit of Facebook. But look, a decade later and its estimated value is $245 billion. In my opinion, Facebook has lost its meaning of connecting people – it’s turned into an enormous money making business. Oh, you know what I am talking about – remember the reason you turned ad blocker on. That’s right.

The Internet is just a toddler yet. Who knows what options it will offer in the future – maybe receiving food via email? I certainly wouldn’t mind that.

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3 Comments

  1. Actually, I am wondering now how many opportunities can be given for us by the Internet. It is really exciting, but on other hand it’s also scary. It’s scary, because I am afraid of disappearance of relations between people, who are focused mainly on their mobiles, tablets and laptops even nowadays. How often does it happen that we are around the people, for instance in the class, but we are on our mobiles instead of making new friends? We can access more things online and it makes us more lazy. We don’t leave home as much, don’t spend time with our friends face-to-face. What will happen then when the Internet is further developed?

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  2. It’s interesting that you touch upon the subject of communication and the initial purpose for Facebook being to connect people – especially considering the amount of people that use it daily, as you mentioned. I think to a certain extent Facebook has completely fulfilled its goal at achieving ‘connecting people’ – as you discuss how easy it is to communicate with people from anywhere around the world now. However, I do agree that the effects on our social skills in real life is saddening. I think there is an element of a façade in our online presence that can make us more socially awkward in real life. Alternatively, being online can put people at ease, encouraging them to come out of their shell more.

    I understand your point about Facebook losing it’s meaning of ‘connecting people’ however I don’t think this is something new. When we consider the amount of information we happily pass over to sites like Facebook thinking it’s a free service, we must think about what the companies are getting in return. They have never provided these services for nothing and are constantly seeking to know what we are interested in and what kind of target audience we come under. This is all in order to market us to adverts and who knows what else they use the information for! It’s a scary thought really.

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  3. It is amazing to see how Facebook has grown dramatically in a relatively short period of time. To be worth £245 billion is staggering. I think you’re probably right that this may not have been the aim in the beginning, but I believe that in any walk of life, money is what it comes down to at the end of the day. Particularly in media, I believe the business aspect often overcomes the moral standpoint. All media institutions are businesses first and foremost, and will do whatever it takes to make money. I think that corporations will continue to try and exploit the internet in any way they possibly can to make money, and who can blame them.

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